Season’s Final Squeeze

It’s about the latest he’s pressed grapes into the fall season, but David Volmut of Wind Rose Cellars made his final batch of white grape wine on Oct. 28 at his facility in Sequim.

The late production came as a result of some unusually late summer and early fall days reaching 90 degrees, Volmut said, that wasn’t allowing photosynthesis to happen in fruit from plants harvested near Prosser, Wa.

Despite it being about a month late, Volmut says this is “a really good harvest.”

The final batch is a mass of pinot grigio grapes that takes about a full work day to press and will take another six weeks to ferment. He expects this batch to be released in the spring. Red wines take longer, Volmut said — about two years.

In a year, Volmut estimates, Wind Rose makes about 1,500 cases of wine, or about 18,000 bottles.

Volmut started his career in wine-making in Eastern Washington in 2009. His wife Jennifer took a job with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, and after looking at some possibilities of an operation near the Columbia River gorge they moved to Sequim in 2011.

Wind Rose Cellars has a tasting room/wine bar/art gallery/music venue at 143 W. Washington St. in downtown Sequim.

Storage can be a problem for David Volmut of Wind Rose Cellars; his Sequim home is part living space and part wine-production center. He estimates his business produces 1,500 cases of wine annually. Sequim Gazette photo by Michael Dashiell

Storage can be a problem for David Volmut of Wind Rose Cellars; his Sequim home is part living space and part wine-production center. He estimates his business produces 1,500 cases of wine annually. Sequim Gazette photo by Michael Dashiell

The leftovers from a pressing of pinot grigio grapes are composted through a local landscaping business. David Volmut of Wind Rose Cellars says he could probably get more out of these grapes but he doesn’t want to risk getting any seeds or skins in the wine.

The leftovers from a pressing of pinot grigio grapes are composted through a local landscaping business. David Volmut of Wind Rose Cellars says he could probably get more out of these grapes but he doesn’t want to risk getting any seeds or skins in the wine.

David Volmut of Wind Rose Cellars loads a crate of pinot grigio grapes as he preps to press them in late October. Sequim Gazette photo by Michael Dashiell

David Volmut of Wind Rose Cellars loads a crate of pinot grigio grapes as he preps to press them in late October. Sequim Gazette photo by Michael Dashiell

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