Community

Faith Lutheran honors National Day of Prayer

Faith Lutheran Church recognized National Day of Prayer with a special service on Thursday, May 6.

More than 30 churchgoers prayed, sang and recited passages, with the Rev. Roger Stites leading the service.

Stites said the event was special because not many churches or groups recognized the occasion in Sequim or the surrounding area.

His sermon began with words from a ruling in April by a federal District Court judge, Barbara Crabb of Wisconsin, that the government proclaiming the day of prayer is unconstitutional because prayer should be left within the individual's conscience to do or not. Those who don't are considered outsiders, she said.

Stite's sermon focused on Acts 1: 8-10 and how Jesus' disciples chose prayer over some other course of action.

"Their world was shaken after Jesus' death but they committed themselves to prayer," he said.

"We give praise and thanks and ask for forgiveness and for healing. It's who we were created to be - to find meaning in our prayers and depth in one's relationship with God."



First official prayer

Congress enacted the National Day of Prayer in 1952.

This was Faith Lutheran Church's first time observing it.

"We think it's a wonderful event and plan to continue it," said co-organizer Lew Norris.

"No matter what happens (legally), National Day of Prayer will continue. And of course, every day is for prayer."

Faith Lutheran Church is at 382 W. Cedar St., Sequim.

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