Arts and Entertainment

Of Love and War

Olympic Theatre Arts will kick off its 2010-2011 season with George Bernard Shaw's historical comedy "Arms and the Man" Sept. 17-Oct. 3.

Directed by business manager Loren Johnson, the play is promised to "entertain in a meaningful way."

After climbing into a random window, a Swiss soldier - played by Port Angeles resident Colby Thomas - fighting for the Serbian army begs a young and impressionable Bulgarian girl - played by

Sequim resident Corrina Wright - to hide him. In doing so, she's forced to re-examine the values she holds most dear.

"The characters are very fun - they are theatrical, funny, poignant and intelligent," Johnson said.

"We have a really good cast and everybody is working very hard. I think it will be a very good show."

Described as an "anti-

romantic comedy" by the

playwright himself, "Arms and the Man" is one of Shaw's earliest plays and first commercial successes. The satirical play exemplifies the foolishness of glorifying something as terrible as war and of basing affection on idealistic notions of love.

Since opening on Broadway in 1894, there have been six Broadway revivals of "Arms and the Man." It's become one of Shaw's most popular plays and an American classic.

Shaw is the only person to win both a Nobel Prize for Literature (1925) and an Oscar (1938).

"Raina is very naïve and doesn't know a lot about the world but is a die-hard romantic," Wright said, describing her character in the play.

"Capt. Bluntschli," Thomas piped in, "is a quintessential soldier. He's cool, calm and collected but completely out of his element when he meets Raina."

The storyline, according to Thomas, is particularly

relevant given the United States' current involvement in the war on terrorism.

"We've been in war for so long that people don't remember what it's like otherwise," he said.

Thomas, 24, works at All About Pizza but his true passion is acting.

Wright, 23, is a cashier at The Home Depot. She recently auditioned for a theater program in Seattle and is waiting eagerly to hear back.

"Arms and the Man" is a three-act play with two 20-minute intermissions. A concession and wine bar operate on site during each break. Proceeds benefit the theater.

Season tickets allow guests to save a little bit of money and sit in their own personal seats at each show. Reserved seat tickets also are available now. Audience members can pick out the seats they want and save them online.

For more information, visit www.olympictheatrearts.org or call 683-7326.



Upcoming events at OTA:

• Auditions for the off Broadway musical hit "Nunsense" are 7-9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 10, and 6-8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 11, at Olympic Theatre Arts Center. Parts are available for five women ages 20-60. Actresses will be asked to read from the script and sing a song.

Scripts are available at the Sequim and Port Angeles libraries.

Volunteers are needed for props, costumes, stage managing, set design, painting, lighting and sound.

For more information call Larry Harwood, stage director, at 457-7356 or Dewey Ehling, musical director, at 457-4250.

• Auditions for "The Thwarting of Baron Bollingrew" are 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 18. The action-filled comedy will cast six adult men and 11 students - male or female - ages 12 to adult in the roles of knights, a villain, a magician and a dragon. To set up a private audition at a separate time, call Tracy Williams at 461-1483.

• OTA is seeking a student or young adult who would like to "apprentice" in the sound and/or lighting booth. For more information, call 683-7326.

• The annual meeting is at the playhouse 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 11.









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