Arts and Entertainment

Dog missing, faith found

More than a year after going missing, Sadie sits in her owner Jennifer Frey’s acupuncture office. Frey wrote about her experience and how it reinforced her faith in God in her first book “Lost Dog: A True Story of Faith.”  - Sequim Gazette photo by Matthew Nash
More than a year after going missing, Sadie sits in her owner Jennifer Frey’s acupuncture office. Frey wrote about her experience and how it reinforced her faith in God in her first book “Lost Dog: A True Story of Faith.”
— image credit: Sequim Gazette photo by Matthew Nash

Without warning, two animals changed Sequim resident Jennifer Frey’s life forever.

Through her first book “Lost Dog: A True Story of Faith,” Frey shares how her dog Sadie went missing in the Blue Mountain area for nearly seven days and in that span she learned to trust intuition and God more.

A year prior Frey’s faith was pressured when an accident at home forced her to slow her life down.

Her horse, True Faith or TJ as she called it, moved its head quickly and knocked its jawbone into her head causing a concussion. At first, she said every thought was like working through quicksand.

However, more than two years later and at about 85 percent, Frey said people still expect her to participate normally and that bright lights and certain activities like driving and socializing can be exhausting. But a year after learning to become more accustomed to her new lifestyle, Frey’s dog, Sadie, a roughly 9-year-old labrador/ whippet mix, ran away.

Sadie, who loved to chase deer, spotted one in Frey’s backyard and took off in an instant. Frey said she couldn’t stop her quickly enough.

The dog had chased one off property before but not to this length, Frey said.

“Lost Dog” chronicles the search for Sadie and Frey’s thoughts on the search and her relationship with God.

Many things that came up intuitively, Frey said, came true such as waiting until Monday for Sadie to show up, came true.

Frey said she searched for for Sadie after hearing the message  but she knew through God the dog was alright.

She writes, “How do you know anything is ‘real’ if you can’t see it, touch it, taste it or small it?

That is the essence of faith. Sometimes you just have to rely on that inner peace and inner knowing.

We had no proof, no security that Sadie was anywhere close, or even still alive for that matter. She could have been eaten by a cougar or bear on the first night – yet we had faith and hope and love and a confidence that the intuitive information we were receiving was valid.”

A happy reunion does reveal the ending but Frey seems to emphasize the journey more.

“After that amazing week — the profound events, the up and down emotional journey, the answered prayers and the happy ending, I knew I wanted to write it down and share it with others,” she said. “My question was, with my head injury still being a handicap, would I be able to get the words down on paper that would convey the journey and experience well enough to do it justice.”

Frey’s plan, she said was to list the events of the week so not to forget anything, and fill in the details to make it “as real to the experience as I could.”

It took her about a year to complete.

“I had to let go and trust that the words would come, the very lesson I talk about in my book,” she said.

By writing the book, Frey said she didn’t have one specific goal but now hopes it finds its way to people who need some hope.

Frey moved to Sequim in January 2003 and operates Serenity Acupuncture. Learn more at www.serenityacupunctureclinic.com.

 

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