Some of Sequim Middle School’s science “Catalysts” for Term 2 include (back row, from left) Karlie Viada, Phoebe Sampson, Briauna Saghafi, Desmond Tippins and Jobe Kirner, with (front row, from left) Zack Thompson, Brett Mote, Burke Henderson, Danika Chen and Lexi Treece. Submitted photo

Some of Sequim Middle School’s science “Catalysts” for Term 2 include (back row, from left) Karlie Viada, Phoebe Sampson, Briauna Saghafi, Desmond Tippins and Jobe Kirner, with (front row, from left) Zack Thompson, Brett Mote, Burke Henderson, Danika Chen and Lexi Treece. Submitted photo

@tSequimSchools — Feb. 7, 2018

  • Wednesday, February 7, 2018 1:30am
  • Life

DISTRICT

The next school board meeting is 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 20, in the district boardroom, 503 N. Sequim Ave. The public is invited to attend, and time is set aside for public comment. To view the agenda and minutes of past meetings, click on “Board of Directors” and “2017-2018 agendas” on the district’s website at www.sequimschools.org.

GREYWOLF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Greywolf first-grade teacher Alex Ogilvie was recently presented the Smart/Maher VFW Teacher of the Year Award. She accepted the honor from Rod Lee, Quartermaster for the Carlsborg VFW Post 4760, on Jan. 31. The VFW Teacher of the Year award contest recognizes exceptional teachers for their outstanding commitment to teaching Americanism and patriotism to their students.

“Operation Valentine” is a project we organize that allows students (and teachers, parents and anyone in the community) to create a handmade Valentine card to be delivered to a U.S. veteran or active duty service person. Support for these outstanding heroes from the public is paramount to their service and their dedication to our country.

As some of the recipients of these cards may be hospitalized or in convalescent homes their journey can be long and is often painful. Other recipients of the cards may be actively deployed or an elderly veteran, a simple gesture of encouragement from a student will brighten their day, and children will enjoy the opportunity to correspond or share their drawings.

Regardless, the cards will be distributed to both local and regional veterans as well as active duty and reserve service people. This is an initiative that can help make a difference in the lives of these men and women, both young and old alike.

This program has been a huge success for the last seven years (more than 2,200 cards from local students were collected and distributed last year alone) and has provided students and staff of many local schools an opportunity to express their thoughts and share their appreciation.

Cheryl McAliley, school counselor

HELEN HALLER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Students in Toni Vincent’s fifth-grade class wrote opinion papers with the prompt, “Do you think students should get paid for good grades?”

In my opinion, I do think students should get paid for good grades.

First of all, if students got paid, then they could start paying off for college. And some really awesome colleges take money. Also it would help our parents out too, so then they could pay some and we pay the rest.

Another reason is that if students got paid for their good grades, then they could buy their own stuff, like clothes and books. If students got paid, then our parents wouldn’t be so tired of their kids asking them for money. Also, we could buy whatever we wanted because we would have our own money, but most parents often say, “No, you cannot buy that.”

My final reason is that students could save up their money for later in life. And in life we will need a lot of money because there is bills, gifts for people, and etc. Also we need money (saved up money) for trips with our family. Some airplane tickets can cost a lot.

So now you can see why students should get paid for good grades.

By Sara German

Students should not be paid for getting good grades by their parents. If students got paid by their parents for good grades, parents could run out of money.

If parents paid their kids because they got good grades, parents could run out of money. Parents could become broke. If parents became broke and students kept getting good grades, kids could start being rude to their parents about money.

If students got good grades and got paid, it wouldn’t be fair to the students who didn’t get as good of grades. Kids who don’t get as good grades as others might feel like the others aren’t being kind or fair.

Students who don’t get good grades might be rude and bully other students who do get good grades and get paid. The bullying could create huge problems at school. It could ruin friendships.

Students should not get paid because of good grades. The bullying and unkindness could ruin friendships, and parents becoming broke could be a big problem when it comes to paying bills at the house.

By Bella Cornell

I think kids should get paid for good grades because it would encourage them.

Kids don’t exactly adore school. When kids come home with good grades, parents love it. Also kids are proud of their accomplishment. But they aren’t getting rewarded. They start to lose interest in good grades and they think their parents don’t care.

Also, it makes children happy when their work is celebrated. When a child is bringing home good grades they don’t have to be given money. All a child wants is their hardworking grades to be celebrated.

When a child brings home good grades, there are multiple choices to let your child know you’re proud. All children are interested in different things. For example, if your child wants to save money for something special they want. You can always give your child something to show them you are proud.

In conclusion, I think that it is reasonable for parents to celebrate their child’s good grades. Children love when their parents are proud of them. Overall, kids’ hard work should be celebrated.

By Mia Sayer

No, students should not be paid for getting good grades.

A lot of people are poor, so if they have a kid who is very smart, they would not have any more money to buy food, water, clothing, and to pay rent or the bills of a house.

Another reason would be that some kids are not as smart as others, so it would be unfair for the kids who are not as smart.

The last reason would be that sometime there is a disadvantage for some kids. For example, if they are late for school, or maybe absent that day.

So no, I do not think kids should be paid for getting good grades in school.

By Ryleigh Miller

SEQUIM MIDDLE SCHOOL

Sequim Middle School science teacher Joe Landoni would once again like to showcase seventh grade students as science “Catalysts” — this time for Term 2.

Catalysts are those students who regularly display an exceptional level of participation in their science class. They are the kings and queens of questioning! They make those thought provoking statements which extend understanding. They are the instigators of inquiry! They are risk-takers, not afraid of making mistakes or failing (as they know mistakes and failure lead to new knowledge). They are the sparks which ignite learning!

Please recognize and celebrate the following fine young scientists: first period’s Danika Chen and Zack Thompson, second period’s Burke Henderson and Phoebe Sampson, fourth period’s Heidi Dail and Brett Mote, fifth period’s Briauna Saghafi, Desmond Tippins and Karlie Viada and sixth period’s Jobe Kirner and Lexi Treece.

Students were recognized in their respective classes and each received a certificate suitable for display on any refrigerator. Keep up the fantastic effort, young scientists. You are excellent role models for your peers.

Joe Landoni

SEQUIM HIGH SCHOOL

Report cards will be mailed home on Feb. 9.

Monday, Feb. 12, is a Freshman, Sophomore and Junior Parent Night. The evening starts at 6:30 p.m. in the cafeteria and includes a general session for all students to cover such topics as graduation requirements, course registration, Skyward and other information. This will be followed by two different break out sessions. Topics include FAFSA, college testing, AP teacher panel, ROTC, study skills and more.

The ASB will be sponsoring a blood drive from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 14, in the gymnasium; the public is welcome.

There is no school Feb. 16 and Feb. 19.

Kindergarten children at Greywolf Elementary have become readers! Here is Kathryn Cardarelle’s class reading together the unit 6 reader, “Kit”, from the school’s language arts curriculum. Students pictured are Alexia Henning and Zaiden West. Photo by Tricia Stratton

Kindergarten children at Greywolf Elementary have become readers! Here is Kathryn Cardarelle’s class reading together the unit 6 reader, “Kit”, from the school’s language arts curriculum. Students pictured are Alexia Henning and Zaiden West. Photo by Tricia Stratton

Rod Lee, Quartermaster for the Carlsborg VFW Post 4760, presents Greywolf Elementary School teacher Alex Ogilvie with the Smart/Maher VFW Teacher of the Year Award. Photo by Darcy Lamb

Rod Lee, Quartermaster for the Carlsborg VFW Post 4760, presents Greywolf Elementary School teacher Alex Ogilvie with the Smart/Maher VFW Teacher of the Year Award. Photo by Darcy Lamb

Students from Kimberly Knudson’s second-grade class display some of Greywolf Elementary School’s “Operation Valentine” creations. They are (back row, from left) Isabella Loftin, Alexander Alokoa, Madeline Niemeyer and Isaac Edgecombe, with (front row, from left) Makenzi Seimer and Kaiya Robinson. Photo by Darcy Lamb

Students from Kimberly Knudson’s second-grade class display some of Greywolf Elementary School’s “Operation Valentine” creations. They are (back row, from left) Isabella Loftin, Alexander Alokoa, Madeline Niemeyer and Isaac Edgecombe, with (front row, from left) Makenzi Seimer and Kaiya Robinson. Photo by Darcy Lamb

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