News

Comments sought on new trail segment

news



Olympic National Park seeks public input on proposed development of new segments of the Olympic Discovery Trail within the park. The proposed segments along the north shore of Lake Crescent and near Sol Duc Road would provide a universally accessible, multiple-use, nonmotorized trail along the route of the historical Spruce Railroad grade.

The National Park Service is preparing an environmental assessment in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and National Historic Preservation Act that will describe and evaluate the environmental effects of a range of alternatives, including a proposal submitted by Clallam County.

That process will conclude with selection of a preferred alternative.

The public is invited to provide input on the proposed project.

Comments help define the issues and concerns and identify actions to avoid or minimize negative impacts to park resources.



The park has scheduled two opportunities for public comment and discussion:



_ A public workshop from 4:30 p.m.-

7 p.m. Tuesday, July 20, in the commissioners' meeting room, Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles.



__A public site visit from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, July 24, at the east trailhead of Spruce Railroad Trail (at the end of East Beach Road). Park staff will be stationed at the trailhead and several locations along the Spruce Railroad Trail to answer questions, discuss ideas and accept public comment.

Comments can be submitted online at http://parkplanning.nps.gov, the Web site for the National Park Service's Planning Environment and Public Comment system; mailed no later than Aug. 6 to: Superintendent: Olympic Discovery Trail, Olympic National Park, 600 E. Park Ave., Port Angeles, WA 98362 or faxed to 360-565-3015. Commenters' entire comment, including personal identifying information, may be made publicly available at any time. The park service cannot guarantee to withhold personal information.

The Olympic Discovery Trail eventually will stretch from Port Townsend to the Pacific Coast. About 60 miles are completed. Remaining segments are under construction or in the planning and design phase.









We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus

Read the latest Green Edition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Jul 30 edition online now. Browse the archives.