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What happens if 'Adequate Yearly Progress' is not met?

The law specifies consequences for the schools and districts receiving Title I, Part A funds that do not meet the AYP targets for two or more years in a row.

After two consecutive years of failing to meet AYP targets, a school enters Step 1 and is subject to the related consequences (see below). If AYP is met the next year, the school or district stays at Step 1; if AYP is not met, it moves to Step 2. If AYP is met for two consecutive years, the school exits school improvement.

School consequences and applicability:


Step 1 schools:

• Are identified for school improvement and must notify parents of their status;

• Will receive technical assistance to improve performance and may be eligible to receive federal funds for school improvement activities;

• Must develop or revise the school improvement plan not later than three months after being identified for improvement; must cover a two-year period;

• Must offer parents the opportunity to transfer their student(s) to another public school within the district that has not been identified for school improvement, if one exists (Public School Choice); and

• Must pay for transportation if transfer is requested. They may use up to 5 percent of their Title I funds for this purpose unless a lesser amount is needed. Under certain circumstances districts may use an additional 10 percent of Title I funds, if necessary, to provide Public School Choice. If requests exceed the amount of Title I funds available for this purpose, priority is given to the lowest-achieving students from low-income families.


Step 2 schools
(failed to make AYP three years in a row):

• Are identified for their second year of school improvement and must notify parents of their status;

• Must continue to offer Public School Choice as described above; and

• Must offer parents the opportunity to request Supplemental Educational Services, such as tutoring, to low-achieving students. As with transportation above, districts use up to 5 percent of their Title I funds for Supplemental Educational Services unless a lesser amount is needed. If needed, an additional 10 percent of Title I funds may be used to cover the costs of Public School Choice, Supplemental Educational Services or both. No more than 20 percent of Title I funds may be used for Public School Choice and Supplemental Educational Services.


Step 3 schools (failed to make AYP four years in a row):

• Are identified for corrective action and must notify parents of their status;

• Must continue to offer Public School Choice and Supplemental Educational Services; and

• Must select options from the following:

• Replace certain school staff;

• Implement a new curriculum and provide additional professional development;

• Significantly decrease management authority;

• Appoint an outside expert to advise on school improvement plan;

• Extend the school year or school day; or

• Restructure the internal organization of the school.


Step 4 schools (failed to make AYP five years in a row):

• Are identified for restructuring and must notify parents of their status;

• Must continue to offer Public School Choice and Supplemental Educational Services; and

• Must begin planning for restructuring (see below).


Step 5 schools (failed to make AYP six years in a row):

• Must implement restructuring; and

• Must select options from the following:

• Replace all or most of relevant school staff;

• Contract with outside entity to operate school;

• If the state agrees, undergo a state takeover; or

• Undertake any other major restructuring of school.

- Source: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Education

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