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Courthouse renovation funds awarded

 

Joel Winborn, Clallam County Parks, Fair and Facilities director, stands near the plaque that lists the Clallam County Courthouse on the National Register of Historic Places. The county received a grant from the Washington State Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation to make improvements to the courthouse.
 

The Clallam County Courthouse may be nearly 100 years old but by Christmas it should look a whole lot younger.


After receiving a grant from the Washington State Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation to make improvements to the courthouse, the Clallam County commissioners awarded the project to Mukilteo-based Advanced Construction on Sept. 21.

The $324,500 project will be funded half by the county and half through the state grant, said Joel Winborn, Clallam County Parks, Fair and Facilities director.

"We do what we can to keep it up, but when these big improvements are needed it is great to have the state kick in," he said.

The courthouse, built in 1915 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was renovated in 1999 when the top floor and exterior were the focus. A decade later, the exterior needs attention again, Winborn said.

The front steps of the courthouse will be replaced, structural repairs made to the bell tower, broken brick and mortar fixed and the whole building will be painted and sealed, he said.

The exterior upkeep is likely be needed every 10 years, he said.

Inside, the cracked terrazzo floor will be repaired, sanded down and refinished, Winborn said.

The first-floor offices will get new carpet to replace the bright orange, but very durable, carpet inside. Some of the orange carpet is covering up sections of terrazzo flooring, which will be exposed and refinished, he said.

Ceilings will be repaired and dropped to hold energy-efficient lighting, he said.

The first-floor offices will look similar to the second-floor offices, which were part of the 1999 renovation, he said.

The contractors have 90 days to complete the project.

Winborn said the difficult part will be moving offices from the first floor to the basement temporarily while construction crews are renovating the inside.

No major construction is needed since the building is in good structural shape overall, he said.

"It has held up well," he said. "If I make it to 100, I hope I'm in as good of shape."



Reach Amanda Winters at awinters@sequimgazette.com.

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