News

Room for joy

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Sequim Gazette staff
 

Local children have a better chance at a brighter Christmas thanks to Sequim Community Aid and a collaborative effort of the community. On Friday, Dec. 16, volunteers handed out hundreds of toys and clothes to 160 Sequim families with 341 children at Trinity United Methodist Church. In 2010, the program gave toys to 425 children.

 

The annual event started in 1974 as a food basket and toy drive and eventually changed into Toys for Sequim Kids.

 

Volunteers, such as members of the Strait Knitters Guild and Sequim Senior Activity Center, worked on making clothes all year. Several agencies, such as Clallam County Fire District 3 with its fire brigade and Toys for Tots, collected toys and items for the event. Organizers said it was so popular in 2010, they ran out of items.

 

Toys for Sequim Kids is first-come, first-served for families with children through eighth grade living within the Sequim School District boundaries. Parents/guardians must show a proof of residency. Toy donations begin around November.

 

Sequim Community Aid continues to provide assistance for electricity, water and rent bills and deposits to families in need.

 

Donna Tidrick, Sequim Community Aid president, said more applications continue to come in due to other agencies taking cuts.

 

To apply for assistance, call Sequim Community Aid’s beeper at 681-3731. To donate, send money to Sequim Community Aid, P.O. Box, 1591, Sequim, WA 98382.

 

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