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Alternatives for Spruce Railroad Trail open for public comment


Olympic National Park has released the revised Spruce Railroad Trail Environmental Assessment and the public is invited to a meeting on the assessment from 6-8 p.m. Thursday, May 17, at the Port Angeles Senior and Community Center, 328 E. Seventh St.

The revised environmental assessment supersedes the 2011 assessment and contains environmental analysis and alternatives for the trail.

The National Park Service’s new preferred alternative would establish 3.5 miles of accessible trail on the north shore of Lake Crescent. The trail would be built to provide a 10.5-foot-wide, firm and stable surface to be shared by pedestrians, equestrians, bicyclists and people traveling in wheelchairs. Both of the historic railroad tunnels along the trail would be reopened as part of the trail; existing bypass trails would be managed for foot and horse travel only.

“Important issues were raised during last year’s public comment period, particularly around accessibility, safety, and visitor experience,” said ONP Acting Superintendent Todd Suess. “The plan has been reworked and is stronger as a result of the public comments.”

The new preferred alternative is fully described in the revised assessment, available for public review and download at http://tinyurl.com/SRRT-Olympic Public review. Public comment is invited through June 8. Comments, along with commenters’ personal identifying information, may be made publicly available.

Send comments to the National Park Service at http://parkplanning.nps.gov or in writing to Superintendent – SRRT EA, Olympic National Park, 600 E. Park Ave., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Call the park at 360-565-3004 with questions.

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