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Summer rules change burn piles' sizes

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Today, May 1, started the summer burning rules inside of Clallam County Fire District 3's boundaries.

 

For the summer, the size of a burn pile goes from a 10 feet by 10 feet by 5 feet down to a 4-foot by 4-foot by 3-foot pile. This rule is in effect now until the start of the burn ban on July 1. Burn permits may be picked up at the fire district’s headquarters at 323 N. Fifth Ave., Sequim.

 

“Recreational fires” (camp and cooking fires under 3 feet in diameter) do not require a burn permit. Only seasoned firewood is allowed to be burned.

 

Portable metal fire pits should not be used on combustible decks or other combustible surfaces and should be safely located 15 feet from structures.

 

A responsible person should be at any recreational fire and should have a water source and a shovel ready for immediate use should the wind or other problems arise.

 

With the weather warming up, the district already has responded to fires in dry stands of bark and brush. A recent fire endangered two homes when a large hedge caught on fire. This occurred while a person burning weeds did not notice that hot embers blew into the hedge. Extreme caution should be used with any flame-producing device and with smoking materials. Each year across the country, devastating brush and wildland fires are started with carelessly discarded smoking materials.

 

For tips and techniques for creating defensible spaces around your home, go to www.firewise.org or call 683-4242.

 

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