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New Blyn totem poles share welcome, stories

Craig Welchel, left, and Bill Konovalov of Jamestown Excavating set “Crane and Kingfisher” in place next to “Seal Shames Raven” at the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe’s Tribal Youth Center on May 8.  - Sequim Gazette photo by Matthew Nash
Craig Welchel, left, and Bill Konovalov of Jamestown Excavating set “Crane and Kingfisher” in place next to “Seal Shames Raven” at the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe’s Tribal Youth Center on May 8.
— image credit: Sequim Gazette photo by Matthew Nash

The poles are up and the welcome sign is on for the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe.

Three of Dale Faulstich’s totem poles were placed on May 7-8 at the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe’s Tribal Center Administration building and Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal Youth Center up Zaccardo Road.

Faulstich said the 12-foot tall “Welcome” at the administration’s campus is a totem pole that traditionally stood in front of the village to welcome guests.

“Its wolf between his legs and wolf designs on his hat and chest remind us that the Jamestown S’Klallam people are descended from a family of wolves,” he said.

“Welcome” was designed by Faulstich and carved and painted by him and Bud Turner.

The other 16-foot poles “Crane and Kingfisher” and “Seal Shames Raven” contain stories of their own, too.

“Crane and Kingfisher” tells the story of a husband Crane and his wife Kingfisher who tricks Crane so she could be with Ermine. Crane whittles his legs down each day to walk silently on Sequim Bay and hunt fish with his spear for his wife. Returning home one day in the winter, Crane saw Kingfisher being unfaithful. Ermine turned white in fear and Kingfisher now has red under her wings after Crane pokes her with his spear.

“Seal Shames Raven” compares the selfish Raven to the generous Seal when each visits one another.

The Raven, in seal village, greedily eats in the Seal’s home for four days before going home. When the Seal visits, the Raven provides similarly for him but in a poorly thought out manner. The Seal said it would be better for Raven to provide a simple meal than imitate him, which shamed the Raven.

Faulstich designed both of these totem poles and “Crane and Kingfisher” was carved and painted by him, Turner, Burlingame, Simon and Tyler Faulstich. The same crew worked on “Seal Shames Raven” plus Dusty Humphries.

For installation, Daniel Goettling’s Accurate Angle Crane placed the totem poles with installation by Bill Konovalov and Craig Welchel of Jamestown Excavating.

 

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