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Summer DUI patrols begin

Extra law enforcement personnel are participating in special impaired driving emphasis patrols between July 1-13 in Clallam County and throughout Washington.

Summer is the deadliest time of the year on streets, roads and highways, law enforcement officials say. As part of Washington’s goal to reach zero traffic deaths by 2030, extra law enforcement teams are working together to stop drivers who drive impaired, speed, fail to use their seat belts and or break any traffic laws.

Several law enforcement agencies will be participating in these emphasis patrols, including the Washington State Patrol, Sequim Police Department, Clallam County Sheriff’s Office and Port Angeles Police Department.

DUI convictions can land violators a $5,000 fine, having their license suspended or revoked and/or the requirement of an ignition interlock installed on their vehicles. Violators are put on probation and required to be evaluated for alcohol or other drug problems, required to participate in a treatment program and have their insurance premiums increase.

Other costs to DUI violations, law officials note, include lawyer fees, emergency response fees, towing and impound costs, damages incurred in crashes, and in certain cases, judges may order violators to attend and pay for the cost to attend a DUI Victims Panel and/or traffic school.

Law enforcement officials urge those consuming alcohol and/or drugs — including prescription and over-the-counter medications — to make arrangements for alternate transportation before they go out.

 

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