Clallam County Hearing Examiner Andrew Reeves, right, approved a 66 manufactured home development this week. Local neighbors, calling themselves Concerned Atterberry Neighbors, filed complaints on their own and through attorney Alex Sidles, on left, to stop the project for perceived issues with impact on fish habitat, traffic and much more. Sequim Gazette file photo by Matthew Nash

Clallam County Hearing Examiner Andrew Reeves, right, approved a 66 manufactured home development this week. Local neighbors, calling themselves Concerned Atterberry Neighbors, filed complaints on their own and through attorney Alex Sidles, on left, to stop the project for perceived issues with impact on fish habitat, traffic and much more. Sequim Gazette file photo by Matthew Nash

Carlsborg manufactured home park approved off Atterberry Road

After nearly two years of debates and procedures, CA Homes, Inc.’s 55-and-older manufactured home Carlsborg project is moving forward.

Clallam County Hearing Examiner Andrew Reeves approved the long-contested project on Feb. 25, allowing developer Chris Anderson to build 66 manufactured homes on about 8.66 acres of 15.5 acres at the northeast corner of Atterberry and Hooker Roads.

Anderson was unavailable for comment and no timeline has been given for construction to begin on the project.

In Anderson’s plans, he said homes range from 1,200- to 1,700-square-feet and will sell for about $150,000, with each property being leased to him. The first phase of the project will include 36 homes.

Opponents have 10 calendar days from Feb. 25 to file a reconsideration through the hearing examiner.

Reeves previously denied two versions of Anderson’s plans, starting with a 73-home project in August 2017 and then a similar 66-home project in July 2018. He also denied county staff’s and Anderson’s reconsideration request last year, too.

Neighbors, calling themselves Concerned Atterberry Neighbors (CAN), have contested the project since its first iteration for a number of reasons including the project’s impact on threatened fish in Matriotti Creek, and on traffic and the general aesthetic of the rural area.

Charles Meyer, a spokesperson for the group, said they are disappointed in Reeves’ decision but whether they’ll file for reconsideration hasn’t been discussed yet.

“CAN hasn’t had a chance to strategize and consider options,” Meyer said. “We do see the hearing examiner responded to a lot of our concerns in his conditions.”

Some of Reeves’ conditions state Anderson must:

• Widen the north side of Atterberry Road 20 feet from the center lane for the length of the project to accommodate Clallam County’s 6-year Transportation Improvement Plan

• Put mitigation in place to control erosion

• Submit a stormwater plan before final plat

• Connect to the Carlsborg Sewer System

• Install landscaping buffers and fences along Atterberry Road and the western property

• Submit a lighting plan to prevent glare and ensure outdoor lighting projects down

One point of contention throughout the approval process has been the classification of Matriotti Creek as a Type 2 or Type 3 creek. CAN members attested it was a Type 2 creek and required a 150 foot building buffer but county staff said it was a Type 3 and required a 100 foot buffer and that a county map saying it was Type 2 was incorrect.

For this proposal, Senior Planner Donella Clark said staff held a stream classification meeting on Nov. 14, 2018, with multiple agencies to determine if neighboring Matriotti Creek was a Type 2 or 3 stream. They determined it was a Type 3 stream and requires a 100-foot buffer.

Reeves affirmed the county’s decision in one of his conditions, stating, “The 100-foot buffer of Matriotti Creek, a Type 3 stream, must be measured from the ordinary high water mark of the stream per CCC 27.12.315 and shall be confirmed by staff prior to surveying the buffer on the final plat.”

At the project’s Feb. 7 hearing, Alex Sidles, attorney for CAN, said state law should have allowed for contesting parties, like the CAN group, to be included in the stream classification discussion. He also said how the group came to its decision didn’t go into enough detail.

Reeves denied Anderson’s previous request for not having sidewalks as required by the Carlsborg Capital Facilities Plan, not enough overflow parking and not having a plan for the site’s Critical Aquifer Recharge Area.

However, following county staff testimony for this plan, Reeves did not require sidewalks on Atterberry Road. Anderson submitted plans for eight additional overflow parking spots along with two spots in each garage and two spots in each driveway. He also submitted a Critical Aquifer Recharge Area Report that county staff said won’t affect the aquifer/surface water including Matriotti Creek.

For the project, vehicles will access the manufactured home park on Atterberry Road, and in a traffic study it states the new site would add 312 average daily trips to the road, increasing Atterberry Road traffic by about 26 percent.

For more information about the Clallam County Hearing Examiner, visit www.clallam.net/permits/hearing examiner.html.

Reach Matthew Nash at mnash@sequimgazette.com.

The Carlsborg manufactured home park is moving forward after being denied twice in two years by Clallam County Hearing Examiner Andrew Reeves. The plan’s first phase proposes 36 homes be built followed by the remaining 30. Photo courtesy of Clallam County

The Carlsborg manufactured home park is moving forward after being denied twice in two years by Clallam County Hearing Examiner Andrew Reeves. The plan’s first phase proposes 36 homes be built followed by the remaining 30. Photo courtesy of Clallam County

The Carlsborg manufactured home park is moving forward after being denied twice in two years by Clallam County Hearing Examiner Andrew Reeves. The plan’s first phase proposes 36 homes be built followed by the remaining 30. Photo courtesy of Clallam County

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