How our lawmakers voted — Feb. 7, 2018

  • Wednesday, February 7, 2018 1:30am
  • News

With the first legislative cutoff deadline February 2nd, the last day bills can be voted out of committee in their originating chamber, lawmakers have been busy moving bills through the committee process. Budget-related and transportation bills had until Feb. 6 to be voted out of committee.

Both the House and the Senate did take time for floor action last week and passed dozens of bills — many with unanimous or near-unanimous votes.

Below are notable bills that passed by closer margins.

Senate Bill 6219, Concerning health plan coverage of reproductive health care

Passed the Senate on Jan. 31 by a vote of 26-22 (one member excused)

This measure would require health insurance plans in Washington that offer maternity care coverage to also cover elective abortions. It would also mandate coverage for all contraceptive drugs, devices, products and services, as well as voluntary sterilization with no co-payments or deductibles. Amendments to exclude elective abortion for gender selection and granting exemptions for employers opposed to abortion on conscience or religious grounds were rejected. The bill is now before the House Health Care and Wellness Committee.

Sen. Kevin Van De Wege (D-Sequim) Yes

House Bill 1523, Requiring health plans to cover, with no cost sharing, the same preventive services required by federal law as of December 2016

Passed the House on Jan. 31 by a vote of 56-38 (four members excused)

Under this bill, a health insurance plan in Washington must, at a minimum, provide coverage for the same preventive services required by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and any federal rules or guidance in effect on December 31, 2016. These include contraception for women, immunizations for certain diseases, autism screening for children blood pressure and cholesterol screenings; and screenings for certain diseases, including diabetes, colorectal cancer, and HIV. A health plan may not impose cost-sharing requirements for these preventive services. The bill is now before the Senate Health and Long Term Care Committee.

Rep. Mike Chapman (D-Port Angeles) Yes

Rep. Steve Tharinger (D-Sequim) Yes

House Bill 1188, Concerning the use of child passenger restraint systems

Passed the House on Jan. 31 by a vote of 64-30 (four members excused)

The bill requires a child to be properly secured in a rear-facing child restraint system until the age of 2 or until it reaches the seat manufacturer-set weight and height limits. A child not secured in a rear-facing seat who is under the age of 4 must be properly secured in a forward-facing child restraint system until he or she reaches the seat manufacturer-set weight or height limits. Children under the age of 10 or under 4 feet 9 inches must be properly secured in a child booster seat until they reach the seat-manufacturer-set weight or height limits. The bill also mandates that the Washington Traffic Safety Commission produce and distribute informational and educational material on child restraint systems. The bill is now before the Senate Transportation Committee.

Rep. Chapman Yes

Rep. Tharinger Yes

House Bill 1169, Enacting the student opportunity, assistance, and relief act

Passed the House on Jan. 31 by a vote of 79-15 (four members excused)

The bill would repeal multiple provisions in current law that allow suspension of a professional license due to student loan default. It changes the judgment interest rate for unpaid private student loan debt to 2 percentage points above the prime rate, unless the judgment interest rate is specified in the contract and increases the bank account and wage garnishment exemptions for judgments on private student loan debt. Garnishment and continuing liens on earnings would have to specify whether they are for private student loan debt, and if so, to notify the debtor of their exemption rights for private student loan debt. The bill is now before the Senate Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee.

Rep. Chapman Yes

Rep. Tharinger Yes

House Bill 1060, Concerning the administration of marijuana to students for medical purposes

Passed the House on Jan. 31 by a vote of 67-27 (four members excused)

This bill would require school districts to allow students to consume marijuana for medical purposes on school grounds, aboard a school bus, or while attending a school-sponsored event. It directs school districts to establish policies related to the consumption of marijuana by students for medical purposes if requested by the parent or guardian of a student who is a qualifying patient. The bill is now before the Senate Early Learning and K-12 Education Committee.

Rep. Chapman Yes

Rep. Tharinger Yes

House Bill 2384, Concerning consumer reporting agency security freeze fees

Passed the House on Jan. 31 by a vote of 81-13 (four members excused)

This bill would prohibit a consumer reporting agency from imposing a charge on a consumer for a request to place, temporarily lift, or remove a security freeze. The bill is now before the Senate Financial Institutions and Insurance Committee.

Rep. Chapman Yes

Rep. Tharinger Yes

House Bill 2311, Reducing barriers to student participation in extracurricular activities

Passed the House on Jan. 31 by a vote of 62-32 (four members excused)

This bill would limit the maximum fee charged to a public or private high school student who is eligible for federal free and reduced-price meals program, to five dollars for an associated student body card, other student identification card, participating in an extracurricular activity, or participating in career and technical student organizations. It would also prohibit a student from being required to complete a physical examination to participate in extracurricular activities more often than every twenty-four months. The bill is now before the Senate Early Learning and K-12 Education Committee.

Rep. Chapman Yes

Rep. Tharinger Yes

House Bill 2419, Regarding beer, wine, cider, and mead at farmers markets

Passed the House on Jan. 29, 2018 by a vote of 78-17 (three members excused)

The bill would authorize microbreweries to sell growlers and cans of beer to the public and domestic wineries to sell cider and mead of its own production by the bottle or in a growler at farmers markets. It also allows domestic wineries to provide tasting samples of cider and mead to the public at farmers markets. The bill is now before the Senate Labor and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Chapman Yes

Rep. Tharinger Yes.

More in News

Firefighters with Clallam County Fire District 3 quickly worked to stop a truck fire from spreading to a historic barn on Old Olympic Highway on Feb. 15. Photo courtesy of Clallam County Fire District 3
District 3 crews battle trailer, truck fires over Valentine’s Day

A trailer on US Highway 101 was ruled a total loss on… Continue reading

Fundraiser to help bring monument to Forks VFW

Village Concepts of Port Angeles/Park View Villas, hosts a pancake breakfast fundraiser… Continue reading

Public comment extended for Olympic Hot Springs Road environmental assessment

The public comment period for the preliminary alternatives for the upcoming Olympic… Continue reading

A chimney fire started late Tuesday afternoon on the 1800 block of West Washington Street in a log home. Fire officials with Clallam County Fire District 3 say the fire started on accident near the roof and chimney. Photo courtesy of Clallam County Fire District 3
Fire District 3 stops chimney fire Tuesday night

Firefighters helped prevent a chimney fire from spreading in a Sequim log… Continue reading

Senate passes bill to remove the death penalty

By Emma Epperly WNPA Olympia News Bureau The Senate passed a bill… Continue reading

CORRECTED: Lawmakers propose new watercraft restrictions to save southern resident orcas

Bill would establish a 7-knot speed limit for vessels a half-mile from southern resident orcas.

Sequim Public Works begins limited work on clearing sidewalks

The City of Sequim Public Works crew will begin to clear sidewalks… Continue reading

House members propose task force on missing and murdered indigenous women

A recent study reports Seattle is the city with most cases of missing and murdered indigenous women.

Most Read