Senate votes to extend college financial aid to state Dreamers

  • Friday, February 2, 2018 1:30am
  • News

By Alex Visser

WNPA Olympia News Bureau

A bipartisan effort in the Senate passed a bill Wednesday afternoon that would extend financial opportunities in higher education to some undocumented immigrant students in Washington state.

Senate Bill 5074 makes a couple of existing scholarships available to undocumented students who are eligible under previously-established guidelines.

In 2003 the state Legislature passed House Bill 1079, which allowed undocumented students to pay in-state tuition at Washington colleges so long as they had received a high school diploma, lived in the state for three years prior to graduation and had continued living in the state since then. SB 5074 extends that standard to include a number of state scholarships, grants and loans.

Former President Barack Obama in 2012 issued the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals order, known as DACA, which allowed undocumented youth who arrived in the United States before the age of 16 the ability to acquire a two-year period of stay. DACA recipients could renew their status at the end of each period.

DACA students have come to be known as “Dreamers,” after the DREAM Act, a Congressional bill that would write similar protections into federal law but has so far failed to pass federal legislation.

President Donald Trump rescinded DACA in September 2017, with implementation of his order delayed for six months, allowing recipients whose documents expire in that period to renew their status before March 6. A White House memo urged others to use the six months to prepare for their deportation.

Washington state’s Legislature passed the REAL Hope Act in 2014, which allowed undocumented students to receive state-funded financial aid as long as they meet the criteria established in HB 1079.

SB 5074 extends that standard to include a number of state scholarships, grants and loans. Prime sponsor Sen. David Frockt, D-Seattle, said the new bill provides an extra sense of security to Washington’s undocumented students at a time when federal policy is unsettling.

“I cannot think of a more appropriate statement for this Senate to make at a time when the futures of thousands of young people in our state and across the country are up in the air,” Frockt said. “In Washington, we recognize their value as students and as leaders in the only country they have ever known.”

Frockt’s bill passed in the Senate via a 38-11 vote and is headed to the House of Representatives.

Sen. Kevin Ranker, D-Orcas Island, was one of several who spoke in support of the bill. Ranker serves as chair of the Senate Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee, which moved the bill to the senate floor. Ranker thanked fellow committee members Sen. Brad Hawkins, R-Spokane and Sen. Mark Miloscia, R-Federal Way, for moving the bill in a bipartisan fashion.

“We are fulfilling a promise today to make absolutely sure that every student — no matter who you are or when you came to this country — has access to college and the opportunity to succeed,” Ranker said. “It’s the right thing to do.”

Miloscia said passage of the bill was the morally correct, and promised a return of investment as well.

“Washington state will prosper if we make sure these sons and daughters, these brothers and sisters of ours, reach that final step,” Miloscia said. “This is the right thing to do, let’s vote for this.”

Voting no on the bill was Sen. Michael Baumgartner, R-Spokane, who said there was not enough funding to make up for additional students receiving aid. Baumgartner proposed an amendment for the state to create additional funding, which failed to pass by one vote.

“This bill is an empty promise,” Baumgartner said. “If this was such a great and important thing, the majority of this body would have found $5 million to fund it.”

Also opposed was Sen. Doug Ericksen, R-Ferndale, who proposed an amendment that would make the bill apply only to undocumented students currently living in the state. Ericksen said his concern was the bill would create an

incentive for immigrants to illegally enter Washington.

“I think it’s rather immoral to create this incentive because what happens is you have children who are sent across the southern border by themselves,” Ericksen said. “Many of those children die coming to America.”

Ericksen said he believed such immigrants have the best of intentions when coming to the United States, although he is concerned about their safety and the safety of federal agents on the border.

Frockt did not express such concerns about those would apply for financial aid, explaining that there are still requirements to be met before a student is eligible.

“These are young people who are doing all the right things,” Frockt said. “They deserve the full promise that our state and this country have to offer.”

This story is part of a series of news reports from the Washington State Legislature provided through a reporting internship sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation.

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