Guest opinion: What did President Trump tell the United Nations?

  • Wednesday, September 27, 2017 1:30am
  • Opinion

How did a President of the United States, who is a strong promoter of American Exceptionalism, address a body fully committed to an ideology demanding that member nations submit to the greater global community? On Sept. 19, President Trump showed the way to confront this dogma and did so in a masterful manner.

Mr. Trump based his argument on the condition of the world’s people. True peace is not a state of non-conflict between nations. True peace requires that the people of the nations of the world enjoy liberty and freedom. He denounces those regimes that deny their people freedom.

“Those who preach the tenets of these discredited ideologies only contribute to the continued suffering of the people who live under these cruel systems. America stands with every person living under a brutal regime. Our respect for sovereignty is also a call for action. All people deserve a government that cares for their safety, their interests and their well being, including their prosperity.”

Sovereignty, in Mr. Trump’s view, derives from the people, not from national leaders top-down. Where the sovereignty of the people is denied by the leaders, the people suffer and ultimately the nation suffers.

He made his case by the failed example of Venezuela.

“This corrupt regime destroyed a prosperous nation by imposing a failed ideology.”

Mr. Trump identified the source of this destruction on the prominence of socialist ideology over the people, their freedom and their hopes and aspirations.

“The problem in Venezuela is not that socialism has been poorly implemented, but that socialism has been faithfully implemented.”

Mr. Trump stressed that his vision is not to impose “Americanism” on other peoples.

“In America, we do not seek to impose our way of life on anyone, but rather to let it shine as an example for everyone to watch.”

He did lay out his manifesto in simple terms.

“We do not expect diverse countries to share the same cultures, traditions, or even systems of government. But we do expect all nations to uphold these two core sovereign duties: to respect the interests of their own people and the rights of every other sovereign nation.”

Independent nations whose sovereignty originates from their people a necessary factor in the success of the United Nations.

“If this organization is to have any hope of successfully confronting the challenges before us, it will depend, as President Truman said some 70 years ago, on the ‘independent strength of its members.’ If we are to embrace the opportunities of the future and overcome the present dangers together, there can be no substitute for strong, sovereign, and independent nations.”

President Trump summed up his thesis with his hope for a free and prosperous future.

“Our hope is a word and world of proud, independent nations that embrace their duties, seek friendship, respect others, and make common cause in the greatest shared interest of all: a future of dignity and peace for the people of this wonderful Earth.”

Our President closed with his unflinching vision.

“This is the true vision of the United Nations, the ancient wish of every people, and the deepest yearning that lives inside every sacred soul.”

Donnie Hall is State Committeeman for the Clallam County Republican Party.

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