Letters To The Editor — Nov. 22, 2017

  • Wednesday, November 22, 2017 1:30am
  • Opinion

Flier distribution is more like littering

Leaving paper of any kind on private property, such as doorsteps and doors, should be considered littering.

This week I witnessed two men and their children dropping religious fliers from a local Baptist church on my doorstep. They dropped the paper and walked away quickly without knocking on the door or ringing the bell. They gave me no chance to accept or reject receipt of the paper. They were doing this throughout the entire neighborhood. They had their daughters with them who were walking fast just to try and keep up with their fathers.

When I approached them, telling them it was a shame that they were teaching their young children to litter on private property, they told me that as Americans and because of their religious freedom they had the right to distribute the fliers anywhere they choose.

Not once had I mentioned religion but only focused on the practice of littering on private and public property. Being an American or having Religious Freedom should not give them the right to break the law and litter on private or public property.

The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution asserts that everyone in the United States has the right to practice his or her own religion, or no religion at all.

It does not give them the right to force their religious beliefs on others or fail to comply with the laws of America or show a lack of courtesy and respect for others.

Dayne Sheets

Sequim

Supreme Court at times a political pawn

Ideally, the Supreme Court of the United States is a separate branch of government. In reality, however, it has been suborned by the tenacity of partisanship to appoint members who genuflect to the interests of the majority party who vote in their favor. It is exemplified by the previous administration having been thwarted in advancing a candidate because the majority in congress was of a different political persuasion.

The Supreme Court or the Constitution did not give women the right to vote or free Southern slaves. It took women suffrage and a civil war to affect those changes. The folly of governmental on-the-job training is currently exemplified by a neurosurgeon operating on Housing and Urban Development.

Roger B. Huntman

Sequim

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