Local foods, drinks and musicians featured at new eatery

In the few weeks since its grand opening on Black Friday at the Lehman Court Shops, Wild Goddess Brews-n-Bites — a tapas bar/small plate eatery — has already attracted a variety of customers.

Regulars range from children hungry after school or dance classes to musicians, small groups of friends and others who are seeking wholesome local food prepared with skill and environmental consciousness.

“We’re trying to build a community where people can enjoy each other,” said Stephanie Galloway as she and co-owner, chef Alison Prise, prepped last Wednesday for their 11 a.m. opening time.

The name, Galloway said, refers to “our connection with nature and what a goddess stands for: Free, strong and able to take care of yourself in healthy ways. Alison puts love and care into everything she cooks.”

Prise’s parents owned a supper club above which the family lived as she grew up. She said she learned about food and fellowship from her father since an early age.

Sequim Gazette photo by Emily Matthiessen / Alison Prise, left, and Stephanie Galloway, co-owners of Wild Goddess Brews-n-Bites, opened up their tapas bar/small bites eatery on Black Friday of this year at the Lehman Court Shops, 145 E. Washington St.

Sequim Gazette photo by Emily Matthiessen / Alison Prise, left, and Stephanie Galloway, co-owners of Wild Goddess Brews-n-Bites, opened up their tapas bar/small bites eatery on Black Friday of this year at the Lehman Court Shops, 145 E. Washington St.

“Good food means a lot to me,” Prise said. “It makes everyone happier and healthier.”

The food and drinks served or bought pre-prepared from the cooler at Wild Goddess Brews-n-Bites are almost entirely from local sources, save for a few exceptions like cheese curds from Prise’s home state of Wisconsin.

Local sources of food include Two Spot Bakery in Sequim and Colville Fish Company and Maddie’s Mushrooms of Port Angeles.

Garlic from Jarvis Growers was sizzling and sending out an enticing aroma during the interview.

Food choices cover a variety of dips with veggies, pita chips or bread, salads, soup of the day, boards, desserts and small entrees.

All soups are prepared using veggie stocks, even the ones that include meat, so vegans and vegetarians are sure to find something nourishing and delicious.

To-go food is packaged in a mason jar which can be kept, or returned in exchange for a $1 deposit.

“We try as hard as we can to use non-disposable products,” Prise said.

Wild Goddess serves food designed to be shared and also “small bites” to encourage low waste, as their website notes: “An estimated 1.3 billion tons of food is wasted globally each year. That’s about a third of all food produced for human consumption.

Sequim Gazette photo by Emily Matthiessen / Fig and feta dip, fresh bread from Two Spot Bakery, veggies and smoked salmon dip grace a wooden serving board at Wild Goddess Brews-n-Bites in downtown Sequim.

Sequim Gazette photo by Emily Matthiessen / Fig and feta dip, fresh bread from Two Spot Bakery, veggies and smoked salmon dip grace a wooden serving board at Wild Goddess Brews-n-Bites in downtown Sequim.

“At Wild Goddess Brews n Bites we believe in offering smaller portions to help do our part in battling food waste.”

The “Brews” in the name covers beers from breweries like Silver City in Bremerton, and local wines and cider from Port Angeles wineries and Chimacum’s Finnriver Farm and Cidery. They also serve freshly brewed coffee, a small selection of tea and a variety of other drinks.

The menu and a list of partner businesses is available at wildgoddessbrewsnbites.com.

Brews-n-Bites roots

Galloway said, “We have both been in the hospitality business our entire careers.”

Prise was also a special education teacher for 13 years, both for primary and secondary grades.

Galloway’s work involved traveling and managing different properties for resort owners.

“It was fun until I was ready to settle down,” she said. “This was an area I thought I could do that.”

Sequim Gazette photo by Emily Matthiessen / Desserts wait in the cooler along with drinks, snacks and other food for those in a hurry. Food is 25% off during “Hungry Hour”, 3-4 p.m at Wild Goddess Brews-n-Bites.

Sequim Gazette photo by Emily Matthiessen / Desserts wait in the cooler along with drinks, snacks and other food for those in a hurry. Food is 25% off during “Hungry Hour”, 3-4 p.m at Wild Goddess Brews-n-Bites.

Prise said they moved out here for the superior climate and the ocean and mountains.

“I love it here,” she said. “It is beautiful.”

Galloway and Prise moved to Sequim in March; Prise also works at Stymie’s Bar and Grill, and said their staff has been very supportive.

The interior of the eatery is full of comfortable chairs and tables for gathering and relaxing while enjoying the food with friends old and new and playing games or reading or listening to the live music which Wild Goddess hosts weekly.

Wild Goddess hosts musicians during the day and the evening; visit the website for specific times.

“We are in the beginning stages of building a regular music line up along with some other small events,” Galloway said. “We welcome anyone to play when there are no other scheduled performances/events.”

Sequim Gazette photo by Emily Matthiessen / Sequim duo Nightbird (Shirley Mercer, left, and Kim Hammon) play a variety of covers at Wild Goddess Brews-n-Bites last Friday evening. “The owners are excellent to work with,” said Mercer. “Other musicians should give it a try.”

Sequim Gazette photo by Emily Matthiessen / Sequim duo Nightbird (Shirley Mercer, left, and Kim Hammon) play a variety of covers at Wild Goddess Brews-n-Bites last Friday evening. “The owners are excellent to work with,” said Mercer. “Other musicians should give it a try.”

Wild Goddess Brews-N-Bites will be open on Christmas Eve and Christmas day as well as New Year’s Eve and Day (see box).

“Friday night was probably exactly as we envisioned this place,” Galloway said, describing the scene the previous Friday, with a musician at each end of the eatery taking turns playing, a young couple and an older couple getting to know each other, two people playing cards, and others sharing a cheese board.

“We already have regulars. To see them bring in their family and friends is great.”

Wild Goddess Brews-n-Bites

Tapas bar/small plate eatery

Where: 145 E. Washington St. Suite D

Hours: 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sundays, Tuesdays; 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Wednesdays, Thursdays; 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays

Special holiday hours: 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Dec. 24; 2-8 p.m. Dec. 25; 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Dec. 31, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Jan. 1

More info/website(s): wildgoddessbrewsnbites.com, facebook.com/wildgoddessbrewsnbites, Instagram.com/wildgoddessbrewsnbites

Sequim Gazette photo by Emily Matthiessen / The Greek salad at Wild Goddess Brews-n-Bites, like all the food, can be eaten in store or carried out in a mason jar; a $1 deposit fee will be paid upon the jar’s return, or the customer can keep for reuse at home.

Sequim Gazette photo by Emily Matthiessen / The Greek salad at Wild Goddess Brews-n-Bites, like all the food, can be eaten in store or carried out in a mason jar; a $1 deposit fee will be paid upon the jar’s return, or the customer can keep for reuse at home.