Letters to the editor — Nov. 13, 2019

B&B project unrealistic

I have read the articles about the woman from California that wants to build a 32,000-square-foot foot bed-and-breakfast on Sequim Bay “Motion to dismiss in B&B case,” Sequim Gazette, Nov. 6, page A-10). Her numbers and projections are totally unrealistic.

I was a partner in a B&B out in pastoral Gardner for a number of years and I can say from experience that there is no way she can stay full 65 percent of the time and $1,200 per night is totally improbable.

I am willing to bet the farm these projections are deeply flawed and the business would fail. Then what happens to a monstrous home on Sequim Bay? It sits as an empty eyesore because it never should have been built in the first place.

Nancy Talbot

Sequim

Kudos for the book donations

I want to thank all of you for your response to my plea for books! Kudo’s especially to Patricia, Patty, Philomena, Susan, Valarie and Vicki! I had an abundance of books this year, estimated that I handed out more than 600 books!

I even have a small box to start the collection for next year!

Thank you again. May all of you have a wonderful season of love and generous giving.

Karla “The Reading Mother” Morgan

Sequim

Climate fraud

Regarding ”City, tribal officials discuss MAT clinic” (Sequim Gazette, Nov. 6, page A-1)”:

One would think that if the establishment of a MAT clinic were put to a vote by Clallam County citizens, the result would be an emphatic “No.”

In response to Bertha Cooper’s diatribe, “Let nature take its … ” (Sequim Gazette, Nov. 6, page A-12):

The California fires are not the result of nature, but the result of poor forest management caused by the political clout of environmental cabals who place the existence of some obscure Bark Beetle over lives and property of human beings. She is right about “power lines are still strung on poles.” They aren’t underground because of money and political environmentalism standing in the way.

The “ravages” of pollution, drought, storms, winds and fires are as old as the Earth — not something new.

Despite her attempt to disguise it, the root of her wordy column is “climate change.” I will remind her that without fossil fuels she would not be taking hot showers, eating cooked food or driving to the market to obtain it.

“Climate change” is nothing more than an unproven theory based upon the figment of computer modeling imagination and universally accepted by the gullible. This theory has been politicized to the point of abject absurdity.

As Bertrand Russell stated, “The fact that an opinion is widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd. Indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind a wide spread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.”

Ethan Harris

Sequim

‘Ignorance is no excuse’

At the end of World War II on many poles at street corners in Tacoma were signs that read: “Ignorance of the law is no excuse!” Delete “of the law,” the signs’ words are still germane.

The people of Port Angeles voted against fluoridation of their drinking water, refuting empirical facts of benefits of fluoridation for more than 30 years. Recently, letters to the editor to the Peninsula Daily News claim the empirical data showing global adverse effects of climate change are a hoax. If a hoax, are scientists in nearly 200 countries (Ref: Paris Climate Accord) wrong? There has been accelerated melting of the polar ice caps since the 1990s. Flooding of some of the world’s coastal cities and low islands is happening now.

In just 20 years, I have witnessed changes in The Great Barrier Reef of Australia, while snorkeling from Heron Island in the south to Lizard Island in the north, i.e., coral bleaching/dying, less marine life. In conversations at their Queensland University research station, marine ecologists say the oceans are becoming more acidic from carbon dioxide absorption, ocean waters are becoming warmer and man-made pollution is increasing. PBS says “mega” wildfires are becoming global and intentional burning of Brazil’s massive rainforests both rob us of oxygen.

Burning fossil fuels contaminates needed clean air and clean water. Fossil fuel alternatives exist for all but air travel. Solution(s) to these global problems will benefit readers, their children and posterity.

Denying the problem doesn’t help. Ignorance is no excuse!

Richard Hahn

Sequim

Trump ‘duty-bound’ to investigate Biden

Congressman Derek Kilmer played a Halloween trick on our president by voting for the so-called impeachment resolution.

His primary reason? “Specifically, the President … asked a foreign leader to dig up dirt on a political rival.” That statement is demonstrably false.

In the publicly available transcript, the president said: “There’s a lot of talk about Biden’s son, that Biden … went around bragging that he stopped the prosecution so if you can look into it … It sounds horrible to me.”

President Trump was not asking Ukraine to dig up dirt on Vice President Biden. He was simply noting that Biden had already brashly, arrogantly confessed to his own dirty laundry with Ukrainian officials in early 2018: “I said, you’re not getting the billion … I’m leaving in six hours. If the prosecutor is not fired, you’re not getting the money. Well, son of a bitch. He got fired. And they put in place someone who was solid at the time.” (www.c-span.org/video/?c4818429/user-clip-biden-ukraine-cfr)

Connect the dots: Biden is put in charge of U.S. policy in Ukraine. His son is then hired by Ukrainian energy company Burisma and paid $50,000 per month. A prosecutor looks into corruption at Burisma. Biden threatens to withhold “the billion” unless the prosecutor is fired.

Biden is corrupt, and Trump is duty-bound to investigate this slimy quid pro quo.

Kilmer pretends to be an “Ah shucks, good ol’ boy” from Port Angeles just trying to help folks, but he’s really a hardcore partisan taking marching orders from Nancy Pelosi.

Jerry Ludke

Port Angeles

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