For about 20 years, the wisteria at Rick and LeeAnn Nolan’s house has grown along the fence line on Old Olympic Highway becoming an attraction for motorists. Sequim Gazette photo by Matthew Nash

For about 20 years, the wisteria at Rick and LeeAnn Nolan’s house has grown along the fence line on Old Olympic Highway becoming an attraction for motorists. Sequim Gazette photo by Matthew Nash

‘Medusa’ the wisteria goes full bloom along Old Olympic Highway

Now and for the next few weeks is the prime time to look at Medusa, says LeeAnn Nolan.

That’s the nickname she and her husband Rick gave their Wisteria plant that blooms around this time each year along their home’s fence.

With its long, snake-like shoots, LeeAnn said they do their best to keep it off their house because it could do serious damage.

“When it comes to that, I say, ‘Rick, Medusa needs a haircut,’” LeeAnn says.

Medusa has become quite an attraction over the years, she says, as it’s become commonplace for multiple people to stop by and take photos of it along the 6000 block of Old Olympic Highway, just east of Cays Road.

Sometimes photos are for anniversaries or for fun, and the Nolans even take an annual family photo in front of it with their son James, a welder with his Any Angle Fabrication.

LeeAnn Nolan said her wisteria, nicknamed Medusa, has become an attraction for people with many stopping by to snap photos while it’s in bloom.

LeeAnn Nolan said her wisteria, nicknamed Medusa, has become an attraction for people with many stopping by to snap photos while it’s in bloom.

One time, the Nolans received an anonymous letter from a passer-by thanking them for the plant because the person looks forward to it blooming each year.

“It was just really touching,” LeeAnn says.

Medusa came into her possession more than 30 years ago as a two-foot plant in a pot.

“I didn’t know what to do with it, but my husband (who had his own landscaping business and now works for Crouch Concrete) did,” LeeAnn says.

The plant went into the ground about 20 years ago, and has grown so much that Rick has rerouted it to add a second line on the fence to heighten and beautify the wisteria.

The Nolans added an arbor to block it from going onto their house, too.

LeeAnn, a fourth generation Woodcock family member, says she is the third generation to live in the house, and her mother Harriett Peterson was born there.

“I always knew this is where I’d come back to,” she says.

Last year, she retired from her business Perfect 10 Nail Studio following chronic pain from a car wreck four years ago when she was struck at a stoplight by a person talking on a phone. She says it breaks her heart that she can’t serve her longtime customers anymore.

With a constant view of the wisteria and the Olympic Mountains, LeeAnn says she’s always taking pictures of the plant.

“We love it. We’re not prideful people but it brings us a lot of joy,” she says. “We love to share its beauty with our neighbors of Sequim.”

For those considering growing wisteria, LeeAnn cautions that its seed pods can be toxic to pets. She’s says she’s grateful her dogs don’t like them.

Wisteria stretches across Rick and LeeAnn Nolan’s fence line twice to heighten the plant and show off its bloom, LeeAnn said.

Wisteria stretches across Rick and LeeAnn Nolan’s fence line twice to heighten the plant and show off its bloom, LeeAnn said.

Sequim Gazette photos by Matthew Nash

Sequim Gazette photos by Matthew Nash

Sequim Gazette photos by Matthew Nash

Sequim Gazette photos by Matthew Nash

For about 20 years, the wisteria at Rick and LeeAnn Nolan’s house has grown along the fence line on Old Olympic Highway becoming an attraction for motorists. Sequim Gazette photo by Matthew Nash

For about 20 years, the wisteria at Rick and LeeAnn Nolan’s house has grown along the fence line on Old Olympic Highway becoming an attraction for motorists. Sequim Gazette photo by Matthew Nash

LeeAnn Nolan said she snaps pictures of her wisteria often, including with the Olympic Mountains in the backdrop. Sequim Gazette photo by Matthew Nash

LeeAnn Nolan said she snaps pictures of her wisteria often, including with the Olympic Mountains in the backdrop. Sequim Gazette photo by Matthew Nash

The wisteria at Rick and LeeAnn Nolan’s home has wrapped around their fence.

The wisteria at Rick and LeeAnn Nolan’s home has wrapped around their fence.

Sequim Gazette photos by Matthew Nash

Sequim Gazette photos by Matthew Nash

Rick and LeeAnn Nolan constructed an arbor to keep their wisteria from stretching onto their home. Sequim Gazette photo by Matthew Nash

Rick and LeeAnn Nolan constructed an arbor to keep their wisteria from stretching onto their home. Sequim Gazette photo by Matthew Nash

Seed pods from wisteria can be toxic to pets, so LeeAnn Nolan warns pet owners to be cautious.

Seed pods from wisteria can be toxic to pets, so LeeAnn Nolan warns pet owners to be cautious.

Sequim Gazette photos by Matthew Nash

Sequim Gazette photos by Matthew Nash

Photo courtesy of LeeAnn Nolan

Photo courtesy of LeeAnn Nolan

More in Life

Community Calendar — Nov. 24, 2021

Editor’s note: Is your group meeting once more and wanting to get… Continue reading

tsr
A&E briefs — Nov. 24, 2021

Strummers set concerts Olympic Peninsula Ukulele Strummers (OPUS) will perform holiday concerts… Continue reading

tsr
Get It Growing: Happy houseplants

It’s time to bring our green thumbs indoors. Whether you are an… Continue reading

tsr
A curator of connections

“My goal is to not have a single weekend dark, outside of… Continue reading

tsr
City of Sequim picks artwork for 2022 Sunshine Festival

The 2022 Sequim Sunshine Festival Committee recently selected artist Donika Huls from… Continue reading

Peninsula College’s ‘Jazz in the PUB’ concert set for Nov. 30

The 12-piece Peninsula College Jazz Ensemble will present their first indoor concert… Continue reading

Right: Pieces of Civil War veteran Moore Waldron’s headstone can be seen in the right-hand corner of this photograph. Historical preservationist Mick Hersey, left, and the Taylor family of Gig Harbor returned the pieces to the Pioneer Memorial Park of Sequim for their friends the Englands (Moore’s descendants). The Englands read in the Sequim Gazette about the Sequim Garden Club’s preservation efforts at the park and decided to return these pieces for restoration. Moore now will have two markers in the park, as the Veteran’s Administration commissioned a new stone for Waldron in 2017 — an article about which can also be found on the Sequim Gazettte’s website. Moore moved to Sequim with his family in 1905 and died in 1908. Moore had five children and has descendants in Sequim and Pierce County as well as other places. Moore’s great-grandson is the founder of the Waldron Endoscopy Center in Tacoma, according to Cheryl England. Sequim Gazette photo by Emily Matthiessen
Historic headstone returns to Sequim

Right: Pieces of Civil War veteran Moore Waldron’s headstone can be seen… Continue reading

Family Days to feature Santa, children’s activities

Photos with Santa, cartoon characters, games for children and entertainment will be… Continue reading

tsr
Milestone: Master Gardener quartet earn golden trowel honors

Audreen Williams, Laurel Moulton, Jan Danford and Teresa Bibler were awarded 2021… Continue reading

Most Read