Gov. Jay Inslee speaks to protesting nurses on Wednesday, April 24. Inslee spoke on how important breaks are for both workers and patient care. Inslee indicated he would sign it into law if it passes both chambers. Photo by Emma Epperly/WNPA Olympia News Bureau

Gov. Jay Inslee speaks to protesting nurses on Wednesday, April 24. Inslee spoke on how important breaks are for both workers and patient care. Inslee indicated he would sign it into law if it passes both chambers. Photo by Emma Epperly/WNPA Olympia News Bureau

Nursing bill passed with controversial measures eliminated

8-hour shift limit amendment by Maureen Walsh removed in reconciliation

The Legislature on April 24 passed an amended version of a bill mandating meal and rest breaks for certain healthcare employees.

The Senate passed the bill in a 63-34 vote and the House passed it in 70-24.

Controversial amendments to the bill were removed in a confirmation committee Tuesday evening, April 23.

Sen. Maureen Walsh, R-College Place, proposed an amendment which passed that would limit shifts to 8 hours. In a floor speech last week, Walsh said, “Those nurses probably do get breaks; they probably play cards for a considerable amount of the day.”

Walsh’s remarks enraged nurses across the country, who have sent her more than 1,700 decks of playing cards, before Wednesday’s mail was delivered.

While Walsh has apologized for her remarks, it encouraged nurses to come to the Capitol and protest.

Nurses from around Washington headed to the Olympia on April 24, to encourage the Legislature to pass the underlying bill that mandates meal and rest breaks and makes it so employees cannot be required to work overtime.

The House did not concur on the Senate amendments and therefore went in to a conference committee with representatives from both chambers to reconcile the two versions of the bill.

The committee removed both Walsh’s amendment and another amendment that exempted critical access hospitals from being required to give meal and rest breaks.

Instead, there will be a two-year deferment for many small hospitals in having to comply with this new regulation.

The bill then went back to the Senate for a final vote. Sen. Walsh spoke against acception of the stripped down bill on April 24.

“I would like to point out the fact that once again it’s one of these typical situations of urban versus rural. I got a little critical access hospital, it has maybe five patients and we’re going to subscribe how they staff their hospital?” Walsh said.

Walsh said she is “very disappointed” at the outcome of this bill and that it is overreach on the Legislature’s part.

Sen. Rebecca Saldana, D-Seattle, noted in her speech that the bill does not detail how a hospital covers these breaks with their staff but does ensure consistent breaks across the state, which she said ultimately helps patient care.

Gov. Jay Inslee spoke to the protestors Wednesday morning and is expected to sign the legislation into law. The Legislative session is scheduled to end April 28.

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