Angel O’Neal, a veterinarian assistant with Olympic Peninsula Humane Society, works with a new kitten resident waiting for adoption. Photo courtesy of Olympic Peninsula Humane Society

Angel O’Neal, a veterinarian assistant with Olympic Peninsula Humane Society, works with a new kitten resident waiting for adoption. Photo courtesy of Olympic Peninsula Humane Society

OPHS gets $35K grant for new cat enclosures, protective dog kennel toppers

Food, supplies drive for OPHS

Compass & Clock members are hosting two pet food and supply drives in November to benefit Olympic Peninsula Humane Society (OPHS). Collection drives are scheduled for 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 11, in the parking lot at Sequim Safeway, 680F W. Washington St., and 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Monday, Nov. 16, at the Port Angeles Safeway, 2709 E. US Highway 101.

Mary Coupland, Owner and Founder of Compass and Clock, a publication and information resource for those aging into retirement years, is spearheading the drive along with the help of volunteers from Assured Hospice, Park View Villas, Highland Court Memory Care and We Speak Medicare. People can drive up and drop off their donations and pick up the newest fall/winter publication at the same time, she said.

Items needed include: dry dog food (Purina Pro Plan, Taste of the Wild, Diamond Naturals, Nature’s Domain or any other higher quality food); canned dog food (quality grain free and regular varieties); dry and canned cat/kitten foods; kitty litter; Clorox wipes; liquid Lysol; bleach, liquid laundry detergent; dish/hand soap; paper towels and toilet paper.

“We are truly grateful for our community that helps us save lives and find forever homes for the animals in our care,” OPHS Executive Director Luanne Hinkle said. “These drives help us offset the cost of purchasing these items we use in great abundance. We thank Compass and Clock and their members for helping us with this endeavor.”

Thanks to a grant made by the American Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) and the Northern Tier Shelter Initiative, the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society (OPHS) recently received $35,000 for new, large cat enclosures and protective kennel toppers for large dog kennels.

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, shipping and construction of the enclosures and toppers took many months.

Luanne Hinkle, Executive Director of the Humane Society, said the organization had two areas in particular that could benefit from such a grant.

“Providing our non-roaming felines with housing considered best practice in the animal welfare industry was one goal. The second need was for safety toppers for some of our kennels that house large, jumping dogs that may try to leap over the enclosure — a potentially dangerous hazard for the animal and staff alike.”

For the cats, the enclosures provides two separate areas with an adjoining portal to keep sleeping, food and litter boxes separate. Additionally, OPHS retrofitted existing enclosures with portals to allow for double the space.

OPHS can ensure safe keeping of large dogs with the newly installed kennel toppers as well.

“We had concerns for dogs like Great Danes or Pyrenees trying to scale the kennel doors, Hinkle said. “Best practice in animal care is always our mission throughout the shelter along with finding the perfect forever home for all our animals. We are honored ASPCA choose us for this funding.”

OPHS adds generator

OPHS also recently installed a commercial, 20-foot-by-30-foot tent and generator to help house overflow animals and keep the agency operating in the case of an emergency.

The amenities were supported by a $10,000 emergency preparedness grant from the Petco Foundation that was awarded to OPHS in March.

“One never knows when an emergency will be upon us,” Hinkle said. “Once the kennels are full, they are full. If we should have the need to house a large influx of domestic animals, as in the case of a fire, flood, or even a pandemic, we would be hard pressed.”

The large, big-top style tent also performs a dual role as a dog training area during inclement weather.

A new program that certifies OPHS Dog Handlers has recently been implemented using the space for quiet one-on-one training. This advanced course allows a screened volunteer to help train dogs that reside in the shelter.

Above: A Petco grant helped Olympic Peninsula Humane Society establish a tent and generator to help house overflow animals and keep the agency operating in the case of an emergency. Left: Angel O’Neal, a veterinarian assistant with Olympic Peninsula Humane Society, works with a new kitten resident waiting for adoption. Photos courtesy of Olympic Peninsula Humane Society

Above: A Petco grant helped Olympic Peninsula Humane Society establish a tent and generator to help house overflow animals and keep the agency operating in the case of an emergency. Left: Angel O’Neal, a veterinarian assistant with Olympic Peninsula Humane Society, works with a new kitten resident waiting for adoption. Photos courtesy of Olympic Peninsula Humane Society

“We wish to find new, forever homes for all our residents as soon as possible,” Hinkle said. “Many of our dogs need a course in manners, loose leash walking and other areas that make them most adoptable.”

The trainers, coached by Monica Roberts, a certified trainer and dog handler, employ a reward-centric system allowing for a happy dog while reinforcing the techniques OPHS’ staff utilizes for consistency, Hinkle said.

“Not only are we better prepared for an emergency, our dogs are better prepared for adoption as well,” she added. “We are proud to be doing the best we can in both areas.”

Ordering and installation of the tent and generator was delayed because of the COVID-19 outbreak, Hinkle said.

“It is our duty to the community to be as prepared as we can to help animals when an emergency happens,” she said. “e plan to expand this emergency readiness program even more if we can garner additional grant funding.”

Since 1999, the Petco Foundation has invested more than $280 million in animal welfare work.

More about OPHS

For more than 70 years, the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society has maintained an active presence in Sequim, Port Angeles and surrounding areas, sheltering and caring for domestic animals of all types regardless of breed, health or disposition.

The private nonprofit is financed primarily by private donations and gifts and is not associated with any national organization.

For more information, call 360-457-8206 or visit www.ophumanesociety.org.

More in News

Long-term care facility reaches 22 COVID-19 cases; peninsula hospitals restricting visitors

The number of COVID-19 cases on the North Olympic Peninsula continued to… Continue reading

Officials: Avoid gathering with non-household members for holiday

North Olympic Peninsula health officials are urging residents to not gather and… Continue reading

Man in Carlsborg collision earlier this month dies

A driver who was in a three-car wreck on U.S. Highway 101… Continue reading

x
Lighting up the season

A group of volunteers were busy this past weekend adorning Sequim with… Continue reading

x
Sequim schools to close buildings, revert to remote learning

Students in the Sequim School District will return to all remote learning… Continue reading

Peninsula COVID-19 case numbers continue to rise as Clallam adds 58 since Nov. 19

Clallam and Jefferson counties added 13 COVID-19 cases combined as the North… Continue reading

Decision on MAT hearing expected by Dec. 18

Update editor’s note: The hearing for the medication-assisted treatment (MAT) clinic closed… Continue reading

Sequim chamber, city partner to provide more small business relief funds

The City of Sequim and the Sequim-Dungeness Valley Chamber of Commerce are… Continue reading

Community news briefs — Nov. 25, 2020

Tractor Parade modified for 2020 Organizers with the Sequim Museum & Arts’… Continue reading

Most Read