How our lawmakers voted

  • Wednesday, April 24, 2019 1:30am
  • Opinion

With last week’s cut-off deadline for consideration of non-budget bills, state lawmakers worked long hours to pass measures that previously passed the opposite chamber. Members also took votes to approve amendments by the opposite house and send those bills to Gov. Jay Inslee after final passage. Among the measures that made it past the deadline are key bills on Inslee’s legislative agenda for this year, along with bills that would provide long-term health care services paid for by a new payroll tax on employees and remove the personal exemption for parents who choose not to vaccinate their children against measles.

• House Bill 1575, Strengthening the rights of workers through collective bargaining by addressing authorizations and revocations

Passed the Senate on April 12 by a vote of 25-21 (three members excused)

This is the vote to approve amendments by the Senate that clarified a number of provisions like the size of electrical rooms and the number of parking spaces allotted for electric vehicle charging. It also moves the effective date of certain building code changes to July 1, 2021. The bill is now on its way to the governor for his signature.

This bill would bar public employees from seeking refunds of fees they were wrongly forced to pay to government unions.

Sen. Kevin Van De Wege (D-Sequim) Yes

• House Bill 1575, Vote to agree to a Senate amendment on the bill

Final passage in the House on April 18 by a vote of 56-38, four members excused.

Rep. Mike Chapman

(D-Port Angeles) Yes

Rep. Steve Tharinger

(D-Port Townsend) Yes

• House Bill 1257, Concerning energy efficiency

Passed the Senate on April 15 by a vote of 25-13 (one member excused)

Proposed by Inslee, this bill would impose new energy limits and restrictions on commercial buildings by Nov. 1, 2020.

Sen. Van De Wege Yes

• House Bill 1257, Vote to agree to Senate amendments on the bill

Final passage in the House on April 18 by a vote of 55-39 (four members excused)

Rep. Chapman Yes

Rep. Tharinger Yes

• Senate Bill 1444, Concerning appliance efficiency standards

Passed the Senate on April 15 by a vote of 26-22 (one member excused)

This bill, which passed the House along partisan lines by a 57-41 vote last month, would impose restrictive efficiency standards for most appliances that use electricity or water, including washing machines, toilets and dishwashers. The restrictions follow those imposed by California and Vermont and would apply to appliances sold in Washington that are manufactured after Jan. 1, 2021.

Sen. Van De Wege No

• House Bill 1444, Vote to agree to Senate amendments on the bill

Final passage in the House on April 18 by a vote of 55-39 (four members excused)

Rep. Chapman Yes

Rep. Tharinger Yes

• House Bill 1638, Promoting immunity against vaccine preventable diseases

Passed the Senate on April 17 by a vote of 25-22 (two members excused)

This bill, which passed the House last month on a 50-40 vote, would end the personal exemption for parents who choose not to vaccinate their children against measles, mumps and rubella.

Sen. Van De Wege Yes

• House Bill 1087, Concerning long-term services and supports

Passed the Senate on April 16 by a vote of 26-22 (one member excused)

This bill was passed by the House in February by a vote of 63-33. It would impose a new payroll tax to pay for a long-term care program to provide patients with assistance in daily living.

Sen. Van De Wege Yes

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