Democrats push to require firearm training for concealed carriers

A proposal by Senate Democrats would require concealed pistol license applicants to complete a safety course.

Senate Bill 6294 would require conceal-carry permit holders to complete a eight hours of training that would include safe handling and storage of firearms, state laws regarding the use of deadly force, conflict resolution, suicide prevention and live-fire shooting exercises.

Presently, conceal-carry permits are valid for five years and require only a criminal background check by local law enforcement and for the applicant to be over the age of 21.

Under the proposed law, conceal-carry applicants would have to show proof of completed training within five years of their application, and the training course would need to be sponsored by law enforcement, a college or university, or a certified firearm training school. Law enforcement professionals and persons who have already received the training and are seeking renewal would be exempt.

Sen. Keith Wagoner, R-Sedro-Wooley, said he believes that forcing this kind of training on conceal-carry permit holders could be unconstitutional; he proposed incentives to similar training instead.

Conceal-carry permit holders across the U.S. “are among the most responsible and law-abiding citizens that you can find,” Wagoner said.

On Jan. 20, stakeholders and concerned residents like Lauren Owen of Moms Demand Action testified before the Senate Law and Justice Committee.

Owen urged committee members to support the legislation, claiming that Washington is one of the few states that does not require training for concealed carriers.

“Research has shown that gun users with less training are more likely to unintentionally shoot innocent bystanders,” Owen claimed.

Sharyn Hinchcliffe, a representative of Pink Pistols, a LGBTQ gun rights advocacy group, urged the senators to reject the bill on the basis that it would impede individuals’ rights to self defense.

“It would place undue burdens, financial and time on individuals who do not possess the funds available to go search out training.” Hinchcliffe said.

She said parts of the state do not have adequate resources and programs available to fulfill the training requirements.

Hinchcliffe said there are no firearm training schools within 25 miles of the Capitol Hill neighborhood in Seattle.

More in News

Clallam finds 3 COVID cases; new Jefferson County order gives teeth to masking rule

Restaurants, grocery stores and gas-station delis in Jefferson County must comply with… Continue reading

No new COVID-19 cases on peninsula

No new cases of COVID-19 were reported on the North Olympic Peninsula… Continue reading

Legislative races set for November

Three familiar political faces and one new one emerged as leaders in… Continue reading

Ruling again cuts Olympic Medical Center funds

Olympic Medical Center commissioners have learned details of a federal Court of… Continue reading

Fair trade fashion show finds roots in Dungeness

Debut set for Sept. 4 at Impact Fashion online

Colonial Festival continues in adapted fashion

Organizers hope to fully come back in 2021

Sequim staff prepare options for workforce housing development

Planning director anticipates proposals in coming months

Sequim Lions step up for resident’s steps

Despite a worldwide pandemic that shut down their two largest fundraisers of… Continue reading

Olympic Peninsula YMCAs open this week

After a more than fourth-month closure, YMCA facilities on the Olympic Peninsula… Continue reading

Most Read