Attendees at Olympic View Church celebrate 40-plus years in Sequim on Nov. 21 with a special service called “Celebration of Our Heritage” with former pastors attending. Sequim Gazette photo by Matthew Nash

Attendees at Olympic View Church celebrate 40-plus years in Sequim on Nov. 21 with a special service called “Celebration of Our Heritage” with former pastors attending. Sequim Gazette photo by Matthew Nash

Olympic View Church celebrates 40 years in Sequim

While its building has seen some cosmetic changes over the years, attendees and leaders at Olympic View Church say its center has remained the same: a focus on the community and growing a love for God.

“We’re here to build the kingdom of God, not the building of Olympic View Church of God,” pastor Lewis Godby said.

That’s the general idea behind the church’s “Celebration of Our Heritage,” a special service set for 10 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 21, 503 N. Brown Road.

Jim Lyon, general director for the Church of God in Anderson, Ind., will speak, with some of the church’s former pastors/family members planning to attend.

To attend virtually via Zoom, the ID is 656 390 2025; password “love”; for more information, email to melissaovcg@gmail.com or call 360-683-7897.

A movement

As a movement, The Church of God started in Anderson, Ind., in 1881, with the Sequim church forming in 1979. Church leaders dedicated the Sequim building on Nov. 28, 1981.

The church is not affiliated with a denomination, Godby says, with no formal membership.

“It’s a place of genuineness where everyone is accepted in their journey of faith,” Godby said.

That’s a sentiment former pastor and current attendee Chuck Milliman feels resonates today.

“The message of God’s love to people regardless of who they are (still holds up),” he said.

Milliman and his wife Shirley served the church from 1991-1999, and he said attendees continue to “follow the Bible as closely as possible and reach out to the community needs.”

Godby finds “people genuinely want to talk to each other, and they are enthusiastic in their love of other people.”

“It’s a low key setting with no performances; it’s us doing the work of worship and continuing faith,” he said.”

Church board member Christine Rich started attending the church more than 12 years ago with her family and grew up in the Church of God. Coincidentally, the Sequim church’s first pastor Alfred Blankenship (1979-1982), was her pastor when she was growing up in Montesano.

“My family has a long history in the church,” she said, with her great, great aunt serving as a female preacher in Birmingham, Ala.

“The Church of God has always welcomed women in leadership, which is a big deal for me especially with having granddaughters,” Rich said.

Over the years, she said she’s seen church as an extension of her family.

“My family lives here, and all kids have instant grandparents and people who look out for each other,” Rich said.

Focus

Attendees say the church maintains its focus on God, family and community.

“One of our distinctions is not developing our own ministries but trying to collaborate with other believers and secular organizations to help (such as the Sequim Food Bank),” Godby said.

“One of our tenants is to work with other believers and associations. We want to be involved with the people.”

Godby said 20 percent of the church’s incomes goes outside of the church’s operations, such as to help the homeless, and missionaries.

Some of the missions attendees support, include the Pringle Family from Port Angeles, the Sweeney Family from Sequim working to combat human trafficking, and a retreat center in Easton. The church also hosts Al-Anon and Narcotics Anonymous meetings along with Bible studies and 10 a.m. Sunday services.

Godby said attendees are “a spiritually mature congregation focused on the hands and feet of Christ,” and a good representation of Sequim’s demographics from children to seniors.

Church services are broadcast on Facebook and YouTube. For more information, visit Olympicviewchurch.org.

Olympic View Church’s ‘Celebration of Our Heritage’ (40-plus years)

When: 10 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 21, in-person at 503 N. Brown Road.; on Zoom, ID: 656 390 2025; password: love

Speaker: Jim Lyons, director of Church of God Ministries, Anderson, Ind.

Contact: 360-683-7897; Olympicviewchurch.org

Olympic View Church pastors, 1979-current

Alfred and Neva Blankenship 1979-1982

Jeanne and Elmer Hossler 1983

Ron and Ruth Palmer 1984-1990

Chuck and Shirley Milliman 1991-1999

Dennis and Melody Ackley 2000-2015

Lewis and Becky Godby 2016-present

In 40 years, attendees of Olympic View Church constructed two additions to the building on North Brown Road, seen here in 1991. Photo courtesy of Olympic View Church

In 40 years, attendees of Olympic View Church constructed two additions to the building on North Brown Road, seen here in 1991. Photo courtesy of Olympic View Church

Church leaders dedicated Olympic View Church’s building on Nov. 28, 1981. Photo courtesy of Olympic View Church

Church leaders dedicated Olympic View Church’s building on Nov. 28, 1981. Photo courtesy of Olympic View Church

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