Last May, photographer Keith Ross snapped photos of rescued eaglets in Dungeness, and since then the photos have been used across the globe online and in print. The most recent publication to use his photographs was a national school newspaper for second graders made by Scholastic. Photo courtesy of Keith Ross/Keith’s Frame of Mind

Last May, photographer Keith Ross snapped photos of rescued eaglets in Dungeness, and since then the photos have been used across the globe online and in print. The most recent publication to use his photographs was a national school newspaper for second graders made by Scholastic. Photo courtesy of Keith Ross/Keith’s Frame of Mind

Sequim photographers’ eaglet photos picked up by Scholastic for elementary schools

Following the rescue efforts of two baby eagles, or eaglets, last May, Sequim’s Keith Ross has seen his photos soar in popularity.

His work was featured in TV segments, the popular websites “Bored Panda” and “The Dodo” and in print as far away as Berlin.

“It’s been quite the draw,” Ross said.

His most recent photo spotlight came courtesy of Scholastic. The children’s book publisher wrote a story in its February “Scholastic News” about the eagle rescue for its second-grade edition that circulated nationwide, including the Olympic Peninsula.

Ross, who owns Keith’s Frame of Mind with his wife Kryztyna, said Scholastic contacted him in the late fall to use his photos.

A fourth-grade edition of the story is planned for March, he said.

The children’s newspaper details the rescue story with Ross’ photos throughout.

Ross said he was invited by Jaye Moore, retired director of Sequim’s Northwest Raptor Center, to take photos of the eaglets being placed back in the tree in Dungeness on Marine Drive.

Scholastic licensed Keith Ross’ photos for publication in “Scholastic News” for second graders. It’ll be published for fourth graders in March, Ross said. He is developing a book about the eaglets for children, too. Photo courtesy of Keith Ross/ Keith’s Frame of Mind

Scholastic licensed Keith Ross’ photos for publication in “Scholastic News” for second graders. It’ll be published for fourth graders in March, Ross said. He is developing a book about the eaglets for children, too. Photo courtesy of Keith Ross/ Keith’s Frame of Mind

In his words

For those unfamiliar with the rescue, neighbor Kathy Pitts discovered one of the eaglets first under a bush and later the second inside the bush, Ross said.

They had fallen from the nest of their parents Ricky and Lucy, named by area photographers.

From there, neighbors contacted Moore, and staff at Greywolf Veterinary Clinic found the eaglets to be in good health.

Ross was given the opportunity to take photos of volunteers, including Casey Balch, owner of Pacific Northwest Tree Service, putting the eaglets back in the nest.

The eaglets were hydrated, put in a bag and carried up the tree, Ross said.

“(Ricky and Lucy) are circling over the head,” he said. “They were definitely watching the whole process.”

Balch placed the babies back in the nest and the parents began feeding them the next day, Ross said.

As news circulated about the eagles, photographers watched for their safety.

“They’ve survived fine, and have gone back to business,” Ross said.

To get his well-known photo of eaglets he named Eddie and Elliott, Keith Ross got to their level before they were lifted back to their nest to be with their parents in Dungeness. 
Photo by Kryztyna Ross/ Keith’s Frame 
of Mind

To get his well-known photo of eaglets he named Eddie and Elliott, Keith Ross got to their level before they were lifted back to their nest to be with their parents in Dungeness. Photo by Kryztyna Ross/ Keith’s Frame of Mind

Turning the page

After the photos of the babies hit the internet, Ross said several people told him he should turn it into a book.

During this past winter holiday, Ross wrote the story and got the “meat and potatoes done” with help from local photographer Sally Harris, he said.

He’s been in touch with Scholastic about a possible deal and was told what they might be looking for in a story.

Ross said the story is told from the perspective of the baby eagles, who he named Eddie and Elliott.

“No one I know has stepped up and named them,” he said.

“The one sitting up tall and alert is Elliott and the one taking a rest is Eddie.”

A publication date isn’t set, but Ross has big plans with the book, including stuffed animals.

He’s begun pre-selling puzzles of his prints, too, on his website.

“I’m pretty excited about it,” he said.

In between photo excursions for birds and serving as the official photographer for the Sequim Irrigation Festival, Ross sells commercial fuel and lubricants across the nation for World Kinect Energy Services, formerly Associated Petroleum Products.

This May and June, he hosts two separate art shows at the Museum and Arts, 544 N. Sequim Ave. The first features 70 framed prints of great blue herons, and the second is about 100 framed pictures of various birds including the eaglets.

He’ll also auction off a large-framed eaglets’ print at the Irrigation Festival Kick-Off Dinner on Saturday, March 21, at 7 Cedars Casino.

For more information about Ross and his work, visit www.keithsframeofmind.com.

For more information about his upcoming art shows, visit www.sequimmuseum.com and his work with the festival at www.irrigationfestival.com.

Reach Matthew Nash at mnash@sequimgazette.com.

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